Utah Court Reporting

What You Should Know About Court Reporting In Utah
The state of Utah requires court reporters to be certified. The process is fairly straightforward, but it is important to carefully follow all of the applicable steps. Court reporter licensure is administered by the Division of Occupational and Professional Licensing, which maintains an extensive website. Provided here is brief guide to court reporter licensing in the state of Utah.

Qualifications
In order to become a certified court reporter in the state of Utah, an applicant must be at least 18 years of age and a citizen of the United States. He or she must show a high degree of skill in the art of court reporting and be of good moral character. Additionally, the applicant must provide evidence of a passing score on the National Court Reporters Association or National Verbatim Reporters Association testing.

Types of Court Reporter
A court reporter in the state of Utah may gain licensure as a Certified Shorthand Reporter, Certified Voice Reporter or both. In order to become a Certified Shorthand Reporter, the applicant must receive a passing score on the National Court Reporters Associationís Registered Professional Reporter exam. To become a Certified Voice Reporter, the applicant must demonstrate a passing score on the National Verbatim Reporters Associationís Certified Verbatim Reporter exam.

Testing
Testing is not administered or governed by the state of Utah. For information about the Registered Professional Reporter exam, applicants may visit the website of the National Court Reporters Association. Information on the Certified Verbatim Reporter exam may be found at the National Verbatim Reporters Association.

Certification Renewal
Utah has a rather unusual system of certification expiration. All court reporter certificates in the state expire simultaneously on the same day in even numbered years. Therefore, a new court reporterís initial certification may be valid for only a portion of the two years. Every renewal cycle after that, however, will be for two full years.

Legal Concerns
As Utah court reporters are certified under the auspices of the stateís Division of Occupational and Professional Licensing, court reporters are subject to all of the laws that govern occupational and professional licenses. Applicants must sign an affidavit that they have read and will abide by all relevant documentation. Copies of the relevant sections of law can be found on the Division of Occupational and Professional Licensing website.

Utah Court Reporters Association
The Utah Court Reporters Association provides networking and information sharing opportunities to court reporters throughout the state. Regularly-published newsletters keep court reporters aware of changes and issues that may affect court reporting in the state. Seminars and workshops provide the opportunity to network with other members as well as earn Continuing Education credits.

The state of Utah requires all court reporters to be certified. Rather than administer separate testing, Utah accepts the results of testing administered by the relevant national boards. Utah considers a court reporter certification to be equivalent to any other professional licensure, and requires certified court reporters to adhere to those regulations that apply to any license. The Utah Court Reporters Association is a wonderful resource for court reporters across the state.

Court Reporter Logan Utah
5005 Old Main Hill, Logan UT

Court Reporter Logan Utah
1665 North Main Street, Logan UT

Court Reporter Ogden Utah
2415 Washington Boulevard, Ogden UT

Court Reporter Ogden Utah
401 Washington Blvd, Ogden UT

Court Reporter Provo Utah
550 N. University Ave., Provo UT

Court Reporter Salt Lake City Utah
299 S. Main St., Salt Lake City UT

Court Reporter Salt Lake City Utah
410 Campus Center Dr., Salt Lake City UT

Court Reporter Salt Lake City Utah
Salt Lake City International Airport, Salt Lake City UT

Court Reporter Salt Lake City Utah
2825 East Cottonwood Parkway, Salt Lake City UT

Court Reporter Salt Lake City Utah
2150 South 1300 East, Salt Lake City UT

Court Reporter St. George Utah
1731 Convention Center Dr., St. George UT


Wednesday, August 26, 2009

Author
Todd Olivas

Todd Olivas is a court reporter and entrepreneur.
He founded TO&A in 2003.

  Comment by Corinne P. Robertson | Wednesday, August 29, 2012
I would like to know whether a California Certification and/or a certain number of years of experience would allow the RPR to be waived, or whether a California Certified Shorthand Reporter license would allow a person to work as a court reporter in the State of Utah. I am a CSR in California and have been since 1986.


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